This Year, Plan to Solve Pain Points and Thrive

Month: October 2018

Process Improvement Speaker Lee Kuntz

This Year, Plan to Solve Pain Points and Thrive

October 12, 2018 | 1:14 am

Is your organization planning and budgeting for next year? Are you tired of fighting the same pain points year after year, such as overwhelming workloads, demands for better or faster results, or challenges to maximize costly technology? At the recent Twin Cities Nonprofit Financial Group meeting, I shared three steps to solve these pain points this year.

The Secret: Invest in Continuous Process Improvement
Organizations that help and serve others are recapturing hundreds—even thousands—of hours of capacity. They are serving their customers, community, board, funders, and donors in half the time. They are retaining employees.

Their secret? Investing in continuous process improvement to get big, immediate results with a small investment.

Recently we surveyed our client’s continuous process improvement results. Our customers achieved a 1.5- to 3-times return on their investment during the first year after implementation. This return came in the form of recaptured time and error-free results. These organizations continued to experience recaptured time and positive feedback from customers year after year.

Figure 1: Return on Continuous Process Improvement

Three critical approaches bring organizations big, immediate results with a small investment in continuous process improvement.
1. Get trained on proven tools
2. Get coaching to use the tools successfully
3. Maximize everything the organization has now

Because continuous process improvement teams maximize the tools and resources they have now, there is little additional investment. Also, the team achieves results fast when they choose their best and easiest to implement ideas. For example, one leader implemented the team’s improvement ideas the next day.

Invest in Building Process Improvement Muscle
Leaders are bringing the story of continuous process improvement to their organizations’ annual planning discussions. Yet a common question is: What does the initial investment consist of?

As shown in Figure 1, the initial investment in continuous process improvement includes two components: employee time and out of pocket costs for training and coaching. An employee will spend between 5 to 40 hours annually doing successful process improvement. The cost of the training and coaching depends upon the amount, level, and number of days needed. Contact me to learn more about training options.

Find Funding and Support
Civic, public, financial, and healthcare organizations fund their initial investment to kick off their continuous process improvement work in three ways.

Train to Retain. Some leaders include training in their annual budget so they can retain employees. A study conducted for Minnesota’s West Central Initiative found organizations that provide employees with training had a 50 percent lower turnover rate than those that did not. Read more at: West Central Initiative Study Summary. Budgeting for CPI training is a great way to begin your team’s continuous process improvement journey.

Use Discretionary Funds. Most organizations have some discretionary funds. One community action council identified enough money to in their discretionary budget to fund continuous process improvement training for 12 employees. Afterwards, the employees immediately implemented the improvement ideas they developed during the training.

Watch the Budget. Look for times when there is budget available. I get those calls about a month before the organization’s fiscal year-end. “I have some remaining budget to spend before the end of the year. Come now, Lee!”

Plan to Solve Pain Points in the Coming Year
When an organization and the staff are tired of fighting the same pain points year after year, it is time for continuous process improvement. Organizations have recaptured thousands of work hours while delivering better and faster results to their customers, their community, and their board. You can, too! Contact me, Lee Kuntz, to learn more about how your organization can plan to solve pain points and thrive.

Contact Lee today to discuss your challenge.